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Publications of Georg Hinkel

All publications of Georg Hinkel

[23] Georg Hinkel and Misha Strittmatter. On Using Sarkar Metrics to Evaluate the Modularity of Metamodels. In Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development, Porto, Portugal, February 19-21, 2017. [ bib | .pdf | Abstract ]
As model-driven engineering (MDE) gets applied for the development of larger systems, the quality assurance of model-driven artifacts gets more important. Here, metamodels are particularly important as many other artifacts depend on them. Existing approaches to measure the modularity of metamodels have not been validated for metamodels thoroughly. In this paper, we evaluate the usage of the metrics suggested by Sarkar et al. to automatically measure the modularity of metamodels with the goal of automated quality improvements. For this, we analyze the data from a previous controlled experiment on the perception of metamodel quality with 24 participants, including both students and academic professionals. From the results, we were able to statistically disprove even a slight correlation with perceived metamodel quality.
[22] Georg Hinkel, Thomas Goldschmidt, Erik Burger, and Ralf Reussner. Using Internal Domain-Specific Languages to inherit Tool Support and Modularity for Model Transformations. Software & Systems Modeling, pages 1-27, 2017, Springer Berlin / Heidelberg. [ bib | DOI ]
[21] Max E. Kramer, Georg Hinkel, Heiko Klare, Michael Langhammer, and Erik Burger. A controlled experiment template for evaluating the understandability of model transformation languages. In Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Human Factors in Modeling co-located with ACM/IEEE 19th International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages and Systems (MODELS 2016), October 2016. to appear. [ bib ]
[20] Misha Strittmatter, Georg Hinkel, Michael Langhammer, Reiner Jung, and Robert Heinrich. Challenges in the evolution of metamodels: Smells and anti-patterns of a historically-grown metamodel. In 10th International Workshop on Models and Evolution (ME). CEUR Vol-1706, October 2016. [ bib | slides | http | .pdf ]
[19] Georg Hinkel. An NMF solution to the Class Responsibility Assignment Case. In Proceedings of the 9th Transformation Tool Contest, a part of the Software Technologies: Applications and Foundations (STAF 2015) federation of conferences, Antonio Garcia-Dominguez, Filip Krikava, and Louis Rose, editors, Vienna, Austria, July 8, 2016, CEUR Workshop Proceedings. CEUR-WS.org. July 2016. [ bib | .pdf | Abstract ]
This paper presents a solution to the Class Responsibility Assignment (CRA) case at the Transformation Tool Contest (TTC) 2016 using the .NET Modeling Framework (NMF). The goal of this case was to find a class model with high cohesion but low coupling for a given set of attributes and methods with data dependencies and functional dependencies. The degree in which a given class model fulfills these properties is measured through the CRA-Index. We propose a generalpurpose code solution and discuss how this solution can benefit from incrementality. In particular, we show what steps are necessary to create an incremental solution using NMF Expressions and discuss its performance.
[18] Georg Hinkel and Thomas Goldschmidt. Tool Support for Model Transformations: On Solutions using Internal Languages. In Modellierung 2016, Karlsruhe, Germany, March 2-4, 2016. [ bib | slides | .pdf | Abstract ]
Model-driven engineering (MDE) has proven to be a useful approach to cope with todays ever growing complexity in the development of software systems, yet it is not widely applied in industry. As suggested by multiple studies, tool support is a major factor for this lack of adoption. Existing tools for MDE, in particular model transformation approaches, are often developed by small teams and cannot keep up with advanced tool support for mainstream languages such as provided by IntelliJ or Visual Studio. In this paper, we propose an approach to leverage existing tool support for model transformation using internal model transformation languages and investigate design decisions and their consequences for inherited tool support. The findings are used for the design of an internal model transformation language on the .NET platform.
[17] Georg Hinkel, Max Kramer, Erik Burger, Misha Strittmatter, and Lucia Happe. An Empirical Study on the Perception of Metamodel Quality. In Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Model-Driven Engineering and Software Development, Rome, Italy, February 19-21, 2016, pages 145-152. [ bib | http | .pdf | Abstract ]
Despite the crucial importance of metamodeling for Model- Driven Engineering (MDE), there is still little discussion about the quality of metamodel design and its consequences in model-driven development processes. Presumably, the quality of metamodel design strongly affects the models and transformations that conform to these metamodels. However, so far surprisingly few work has been done to validate the characterization of metamodel quality. A proper characterization is essential to automate quality improvements for metamodels such as metamodel refactorings. In this paper, we present an empirical study to sharpen the understanding of the perception of metamodel quality. In the study, 24 participants created metamodels of two different domains and evaluated the metamodels in a peer review process according to an evaluation sheet. The results show that the perceived quality was mainly driven by the metamodels completeness, correctness and modularity while other quality attributes could be neglected.
[16] Georg Hinkel, Oliver Denninger, Sebastian Krach, and Henning Groenda. Experiences with Model-Driven Engineering in Neurorobotics, pages 217-228. Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016. [ bib | DOI | http | .pdf | Abstract ]
Model-driven engineering (MDE) has been successfully adopted in domains such as automation or embedded systems. However, in many other domains, MDE is rarely applied. In this paper, we describe our experiences of applying MDE techniques in the domain of neurorobotics - a combination of neuroscience and robotics, studying the embodiment of autonomous neural systems. In particular, we participated in the development of the Neurorobotics Platform (NRP) - an online platform for describing and running neurorobotic experiments by coupling brain and robot simulations. We explain why MDE was chosen and discuss conceptual and technical challenges, such as inconsistent understanding of models, focus of the development and platform-barriers.
[15] Georg Hinkel. NMF: A Modeling Framework for the .NET Platform. Technical report, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, 2016. [ bib | http | .pdf ]
[14] Alessandro Ambrosano, Lorenzo Vannucci, Ugo Albanese, Murat Kirtay, Egidio Falotico, Georg Hinkel, Jacques Kaiser, Stefan Ulbrich, Paul Levi, Christian Morillas, et al. Retina color-opponency based pursuit implemented through spiking neural networks in the neurorobotics platform. In Conference on Biomimetic and Biohybrid Systems, 2016, pages 16-27. Springer. [ bib ]
[13] Georg Hinkel. Deep Modeling through Structural Decomposition. Technical report, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, 2016. [ bib | http | .pdf ]
[12] Georg Hinkel, Henning Groenda, Sebastian Krach, Lorenzo Vannucci, Oliver Denninger, Nino Cauli, Stefan Ulbrich, Arne Roennau, Egidio Falotico, Marc-Oliver Gewaltig, Alois Knoll, Rüdiger Dillmann, Cecilia Laschi, and Ralf Reussner. A Framework for Coupled Simulations of Robots and Spiking Neuronal Networks. Journal of Intelligent & Robotics Systems, 2016, Springer. [ bib | .pdf | Abstract ]
Bio-inspired robots still rely on classic robot control although advances in neurophysiology allow adaptation to control as well. However, the connection of a robot to spiking neuronal networks needs adjustments for each purpose and requires frequent adaptation during an iterative development. Existing approaches cannot bridge the gap between robotics and neuroscience or do not account for frequent adaptations. The contribution of this paper is an architecture and domain-specific language (DSL) for connecting robots to spiking neuronal networks for iterative testing in simulations, allowing neuroscientists to abstract from implementation details. The framework is implemented in a web-based platform. We validate the applicability of our approach with a case study based on image processing for controlling a four-wheeled robot in an experiment setting inspired by Braitenberg vehicles.
[11] Lorenzo Vannucci, Alessandro Ambrosano, Nino Cauli, Ugo Albanese, Egidio Falotico, Stefan Ulbrich, Lars Pfotzer, Georg Hinkel, Oliver Denninger, Daniel Peppicelli, Luc Guyot, Axel Von Arnim, Stefan Deser, Patrick Maier, Rudiger Dillman, Gundrun Klinker, Paul Levi, Alois Knoll, Marc-Oliver Gewaltig, and Cecilia Laschi. A visual tracking model implemented on the iCub robot as a use case for a novel neurorobotic toolkit integrating brain and physics simulation. In Humanoid Robots (Humanoids), 2015 IEEE-RAS 15th International Conference on, November 2015, pages 1179-1184. [ bib | DOI | .pdf ]
[10] Georg Hinkel and Lucia Happe. An NMF Solution to the TTC Train Benchmark Case. In Proceedings of the 8th Transformation Tool Contest, a part of the Software Technologies: Applications and Foundations (STAF 2015) federation of conferences, Louis Rose, Tassilo Horn, and Filip Krikava, editors, L'Aquila, Italy, July 24, 2015, volume 1524 of CEUR Workshop Proceedings, pages 142-146. CEUR-WS.org. July 2015. [ bib | .pdf ]
[9] Georg Hinkel. An NMF Solution to the Java Refactoring Case. In Proceedings of the 8th Transformation Tool Contest, a part of the Software Technologies: Applications and Foundations (STAF 2015) federation of conferences, Louis Rose, Tassilo Horn, and Filip Krikava, editors, July 24, 2015, volume 1524 of CEUR Workshop Proceedings, pages 95-99. CEUR-WS.org. July 2015. [ bib | .pdf ]
[8] Georg Hinkel. Change Propagation in an Internal Model Transformation Language, pages 3-17. Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2015. [ bib | DOI | slides | http | .pdf | Abstract ]
Despite good results, Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) has not been widely adopted in industry. According to studies by Staron and Mohaghegi, the lack of tool support is one of the major reasons for this. Although MDE has existed for more than a decade now, tool support is still insufficient. An approach to overcome this limitation for model transformations, which are a key part of MDE, is the usage of internal languages that reuse tool support for existing host languages. On the other hand, these internal languages typically do not provide key features like change propagation or bidirectional transformation. In this paper, we present an approach to use a single internal model transformation language to create unidirectional and bidirectional model transformations with optional change propagation. In total, we currently provide 18 operation modes based on a single specification. At the same time, the language may reuse tool support for C#. We validate the applicability of our language using a synthetic example with a transformation from finite state machines to Petri nets where we achieved speedups of up to 48 compared to classical batch transformations.
[7] Georg Hinkel, Henning Groenda, Lorenzo Vannucci, Oliver Denninger, Nino Cauli, and Stefan Ulbrich. A Domain-Specific Language (DSL) for Integrating Neuronal Networks in Robot Control. In 2015 Joint MORSE/VAO Workshop on Model-Driven Robot Software Engineering and View-based Software-Engineering, 2015. [ bib | slides | .pdf | Abstract ]
Although robotics has made progress with respect to adaptability and interaction in natural environments, it cannot match the capabilities of biological systems. A promising approach to solve this problem is to create biologically plausible robot controllers that use detailed neuronal networks. However, this approach yields a large gap between the neuronal network and its connection to the robot on the one side and the technical implementation on the other. Existing approaches neglect bridging this gap between disciplines and their focus on different abstractions layers but manually hand-craft the simulations. This makes the tight technical integration cumbersome and error-prone impairing round-trip validation and academic advancements. Our approach maps the problem to model-driven engineering techniques and defines a domain-specific language (DSL) for integrating biologically plausible Neuronal Networks in robot control algorithms. It provides different levels of abstraction and sets an interface standard for integration. Our approach is implemented in the Neuro-Robotics Platform (NRP) of the Human Brain Project (HBP). Its practical applicability is validated in a minimalist experiment inspired by the Braitenberg vehicles based on the simulation of a four-wheeled Husky robot controlled by a neuronal network.
[6] Hoang Vu Nguyen, Klemens Böhm, Florian Becker, Bertrand Goldman, Georg Hinkel, and Emmanuel Müller. Identifying User Interests within the Data Space - a Case Study with SkyServer. In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Extending Database Technology, EDBT 2015, Brussels, Belgium, March 23-27, 2015., 2015, pages 641-652. [ bib | DOI | http | .pdf ]
[5] Georg Hinkel and Lucia Happe. Using component frameworks for model transformations by an internal DSL. In Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Model-Driven Engineering for Component-Based Software Systems co-located with ACM/IEEE 17th International Conference on Model Driven Engineering Languages & Systems (MoDELS 2014), 2014, volume 1281 of CEUR Workshop Proceedings, pages 6-15. CEUR-WS.org. 2014. [ bib | slides | .pdf | Abstract ]
To increase the development productivity, possibilities for reuse, maintainability and quality of complex model transformations, modularization techniques are indispensable. Component-Based Software Engineering targets the challenge of modularity and is well-established in languages like Java or C# with component models like .NET, EJB or OSGi. There are still many challenging barriers to overcome in current model transformation languages to provide comparable support for component-based development of model transformations. Therefore, this paper provides a pragmatic solution based on NMF Transformations, a model transformation language realized as an internal DSL embedded in C#. An internal DSL can take advantage of the whole expressiveness and tooling build for the well established and known host language. In this work, we use the component model of the .NET platform to represent reusable components of model transformations to support internal and external model transformation composition. The transformation components are hidden behind transformation rule interfaces that can be exchanged dynamically through configuration. Using this approach we illustrate the possibilities to tackle typical issues of integrity and versioning, such as detecting versioning conflicts for model transformations.
[4] Georg Hinkel. An approach to maintainable model transformations using an internal DSL. Master's thesis, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 2013. [ bib | .pdf | Abstract ]
In recent years, model-driven software development (MDSD) has gained popularity among both industry and academia. MDSD aims to generate traditional software artifacts from models. This generation process is realized in multiple steps. Thus, before being transformed to software artifacts, models are transformed into models of other metamodels. Such model transformation is supported by dedicated model transformation languages. In many cases, these are entirely new languages (external domain-specific languages, DSLs) for a more clear and concise representation of abstractions. On the other hand, the tool support is rather poor and the transformation developers hardly know the transformation language. A possible solution for this problem is to extend the programming language typically used by developers (mostly Java or C#) with the required abstractions. This can be achieved with an internal DSL. Thus, concepts of the host language can easily be reused while still creating the necessary abstractions to ease development of model transformations. Furthermore, the tool support for the host language can be reused for the DSL. In this master thesis, NMF Transformations is presented, a framework and internal DSL for C#. It equips developers with the ability to specify model transformations in languages like C# without having to give up abstractions known from model transformation standards. Transformation developers get the full tool support provided for C#. The applicability of NMF Transformations as well as the impact of NMF Transformations to quality attributes of model transformations is evaluated in three case studies. Two of them come from the Transformation Tool Contests 2013 (TTC). With these case studies, NMF Transformations is compared with other approaches to model transformation. A further case study comes from ABB Corporate Research to demonstrate the advantages of NMF Transformations in an industrial scenario where aspects like testability gain special importance.
[3] Georg Hinkel, Thomas Goldschmidt, and Lucia Happe. An NMF solution for the Petri Nets to State Charts case study at the TTC 2013. EPTCS, 135:95-100, 2013, ArXiv. [ bib | DOI | .pdf | Abstract ]
Software systems are getting more and more complex. Model-driven engineering (MDE) offers ways to handle such increased complexity by lifting development to a higher level of abstraction. A key part in MDE are transformations that transform any given model into another. These transformations are used to generate all kinds of software artifacts from models. However, there is little consensus about the transformation tools. Thus, the Transformation Tool Contest (TTC) 2013 aims to compare different transformation engines. This is achieved through three different cases that have to be tackled. One of these cases is the Petri Net to State Chart case. A solution has to transform a Petri Net to a State Chart and has to derive a hierarchical structure within the State Chart. This paper presents the solution for this case using NMF Transformations as transformation engine.
[2] Georg Hinkel, Thomas Goldschmidt, and Lucia Happe. An NMF solution for the Flowgraphs case at the TTC 2013. EPTCS, 135:37-42, 2013, ArXiv. [ bib | DOI | .pdf | Abstract ]
Software systems are getting more and more complex. Model-driven engineering (MDE) offers ways to handle such increased complexity by lifting development to a higher level of abstraction. A key part in MDE are transformations that transform any given model into another. These transformations are used to generate all kinds of software artifacts from models. However, there is little consensus about the transformation tools. Thus, the Transformation Tool Contest (TTC) 2013 aims to compare different transformation engines. This is achieved through three different cases that have to be tackled. One of these cases is the Flowgraphs case. A solution has to transform a Java code model into a simplified version and has to derive control and data flow. This paper presents the solution for this case using NMF Transformations as transformation engine.
[1] Georg Hinkel. Metrics for comparing response time distributions. Bachelor thesis, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 2011. [ bib | .pdf ]